Community-Based Learning Workshops and Lectures

The CSC offers annual lectures and workshops on Community-Based Learning topics that are open to the Johns Hopkins community and area institutions. These sessions are free of charge and are usually held in the spring. We will be updating this page as new events are planned. Below are upcoming as well as previous events.

2018 Events

CBL Learning 101 Workshop – March 2, 2018

Community-Based Learning 101 Workshop
March 2, 2018, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

This workshop is for any faculty that has concerned teaching a community-based learning course. It will help you consider the “how to” aspects of creating and implanting a course. If you have any questions, please email Shawntay Stocks at sstocks3@jhu.edu.

community based learning flyer for the workshop on March 2, 2018. contact stocks3@jhu.edu with questions

Citizen Science CBL Workshop with Dr. Gwen Ottinger – March 12, 2018

Citizen Science: Workshop for Community-Based Learning (CBL)
Dr. Gwen Ottinger, Drexel University
March 12, 2018, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Register now at bit.ly/csc_cbl

About Dr. Ottinger

Dr. Gwen Ottinger’s research asks how science and technology can better promote environmental justice. Her current project examines community-led air monitoring next to oil refineries, and helps build tools to make monitoring data useful to community advocacy.

CBL Flyer

Previous 2017 Events

Spring 2017

CBL STEM Workshop
Dr. William Oakes, Purdue University
March 28, 2017, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

Community-based learning offers many benefits for students and faculty including enhanced learning within the core academic content area, opportunities to develop the broader professional skills needed in today’s global economy and deeper learning about ourselves and the communities we live in. Data suggests that making connections between Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines and human and environmental needs within our communities can increase interest in the STEM topics and careers, especially with populations traditionally underrepresented in our fields. Community-based learning has been widely adopted in higher education but less so in the STEM disciplines. This workshop will explore ways to integrate community-based learning into STEM and other fields using successful examples as a framework and active discussions with participants to explore issues and constraints within their own classrooms. The workshop will actively engage participants in developing plans and ideas for their own students and local community.

About Dr. Oakes

Dr. William (Bill) Oakes is the Director of the EPICS Program and a Professor and a founding faculty member of the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. He has been active in dissemination of service-learning and community engagement for university and K12 engineering programs. He has published more than 100 conference and journal articles and contributing to 13 books including co-authoring the first text for engineering community-based learning. He has received numerous awards for his efforts at Purdue including elected as a fellow of the Teaching Academy and listed in the Book of Great Teachers. He was the first engineer to receive the U.S. Campus Compact Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award. He was a co-recipient of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering’s Bernard Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, recipient of the U.S. National Society of Professional Engineers’ (NSPE) Educational Excellence Award and the American Society for Engineering Education’s (ASEE) Chester Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education. He is a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education and the National Society of Professional Engineers.

community based learning flyer with Dr. William Oakes presenting STEM workshop on March 28, 2017.

Spring 2016

Connecting Classroom and Community | Speaker – Dr. Joe Bandy

Dr. Joe Bandy is the Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching and affiliated faculty in the Department of Sociology at Vanderbilt University. He provided information on topics including:

  • The Benefits of Community-Engaged Teaching
  • An Overview of Teaching Models
  • Community Partnership Development and Ethics
  • Navigating Issues of Privilege and Cultural Competency

The workshop also included small group discussions facilitated by JHU faculty and staff with experience in academic-community partnerships. The Center for Social Concern and Center for Educational Resources co-sponsored this faculty workshop that provided an overview of community based classroom pedagogies and best practices.

Spring 2015

Build It and they Will Come? | Speaker – Dr. Steve Viscelli

CBL 1 Dr. Steve Viscelli (PhD, Indiana; MA, Syracuse; BA, Colgate) is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College. He provided a case study on courses that led to the development of a rooftop greenhouse project and other STEM efforts at a South Philadelphia public school. Dr. Viscelli’s research focuses on the economics of labor markets, particularly in the trucking industry. Dr. Viscelli’s teaching covers a range of topics related to inequality, public policy and methods. Recently he has taught two different CBL courses: 1) research methods and one on public policy and educational inequality. In these classes students researched, designed and built a number of STEM education-focused resources at an under-resourced public school in South Philadelphia, including a rooftop garden, a greenhouse with an aquaponics system, and a mushroom farming project.

This event was co-sponsored by the Center for Social Concern and the Earth, Environment, and Sustainability Initiative.

Spring 2014

Learning Through Engagement:
Linking Together the University and the Community
Speaker – Dr. Susan Clampet-Lundquist

The guest speaker was Susan Clampet-Lundquist, Associate Professor of Sociology at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. Through her courses and research on the effects of social policy and urban development on families and youth in both Philadelphia and Baltimore, Professor Clampet-Lundquist has demonstrated a longstanding commitment to social justice and fostering meaningful community partnerships. In her lecture, “Learning Through Engagement: Linking Together the University and the Community,” Professor Clampet-Lundquist will discuss two of her CBL courses. The first course discussed was about students working alongside a prison population. The second course included pedagogical methods for preparing students for community work as they encounter issues of privilege, race and class differences. Detailed information on Dr. Clampet-Lundquist’s research and publications can be found by viewing her faculty page. The Center for Social Concern, the Community-Based Learning Advisory Board, and the Department of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University presented the 2nd Annual CBL Public Lecture.

Spring 2013

Food and Health:
Connecting Communities and Classrooms in Philadelphia with the University of Pennsylvania’s Urban Nutrition Initiative
Speakers – Mary Summers and Jarrett Stein

The University of Pennsylvania’s Urban Nutrition Initiative (UNI) connects University of Pennsylvania students and youth in West and North Philadelphia Public Schools through outreach projects around food, gardening, and nutrition education. Mary Summers, a Senior Fellow in University of Pennsylvania’s Fox Leadership Program and a Lecturer in Political Science, offers coursework that supports UNI. Jarrett Stein is the Director of Student and Academic Engagement for UNI and is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. This lecture and discussion was a great way to showcase Community-Based Learning while discussing issues surrounding food, urban health, and urban education. This event was co-sponsored by The Center for Social Concern, Community-Based Learning Advisory Board and the JHU Center for Livable Future.